Elvis On CDCD CollectionsGerman Club Edition


 

Elvis Sings The Blues

 
    
 Title:   Elvis Sings The Blues 
 Catalog Number:   18574-4  
  Land:  Germany (German Club Editon) 
  Release Date:  1989 
 value:   90 Euro  
       
  Track listing: 

When It Rains It Really Pours
New Orleans
It Feels So Right
A Mess Of Blues
Like A Baby
Reconsider Baby
I Feel So Bad
Give Me The Right
Beach Boy Blues
Big Boss Man
Stranger In My Own Home Town
Power Of My Love
My Babe
Got My Mojo Working
Steamroller Blues
 

 
  liner notes:  

Tupelo, Elvis' birthplace, is situated in the south of the USA, in the state of Mississippi. Even as a youngster he could not make up bis mind which of the two most popular styles of music he liked best Blues/Rhythm & Blues and Country & Western called hillbilly. He liked them both. Both styles heve leftt heir stamp on him.Therefore itdoes not surprise that many recordings ware fully accepted by the Blacks as well.
The original "Black Charts", the "Harlem Hitparade" in early 1940's developed into the Top 15 of the "Race Records". On June 17, 1949 a new name was coined - Rhythm And Blues (R&B). From1956-1963 Elvis had 28 songs in it, all together it came to 227 weeks.4 songs reached number 1,one of them remained for 18 weeks in the charts. Eivis held number 1 there for 11 weeks, all together. In 1964 were no R&B Charts, thereafter Elvis would not have scored with his film songs. In 1969 there was another change of name. The new word was "Soul Charts", a competition the Blacks decided among themselves.
But Elvis never forgot the Blues. Here are his most important contributions to the musical history of the Blues.

When It Rains lt Really Pours
The original version is by BillyEmerson, recorded on Sept. 18, 1954 at the Sun Studios. There, Elvis had listened to it and tried a recording, too. Only in 1957, in the Hollywood Radio Recorders Studios, a perfect recording was cut.

New Orleans
The white writer-duo Tepper/Bennett created this black song especially for the film "King Creole" (1958). It is a Blues-song played with Dixieland-Jazz-instruments. Probably one of the best vocal presentations of Elvis.

It Feels So Right
It is a recording trom the first studio session after Elvis'military stint, in March 1960. Instrumentally a white Blues but presented in "black style" by Elvis. The "rolling" drums of D.J. Fontana and Buddy Harman were extraordinary.

A Mess Of Blues
The first Blues of Elvis in stereo, made just before "It Feels So Right". "...everyday is just Blue Monday since you've been away.. " Typical Blues lyrics, excellent backup by Floyd Cramers piano.

Like A Baby
Once more Elvis proves his diversity by the fact that this song was recorded after "Fever" and before the million hit "It's Now Or Never". Three completely different styles of music in one session. The dominating instrument is the rockin' sax of Boots Randolph.

Reconsider Baby
The original version is by Lowell Fulson, one of the best West-Coast guitar-men of his time. "Boots" plays 2 sax-solos in a row, a praise-worthy exception in Elvis-songs. The repetition of lyric-Iines are typical in Blues. A superb song that could have been made in the 80's.

I Feel So Bad
A composition by Chuck Willis from the year 1953. Towards the end of the 50's he became famous as the "King Of Stroll" with hits like "What Am I Living For" and "C. C. Rider". "I Feel So Bad" is R&B and the biggest hit in this Blues-collection. lt reached number 5 in the US-Pop-Charts in '61. (in England number 4, in Germany number 19).

Give Me The Right
It is the "whitest" Blues on this LP. Even Elvis sounds more"white" than"black". The recording was made after the before-mentioned: "I Feel So Bad". A"bluesy" rhythm with a very beautiful melody, for the first tirne to be found on the wellmade LP "Something For Everybody".

Beach Boy Blues
One of the few Blues songs from a film (Blue Hawaii). The verses sound "black". George Fields plays a fitting harmonica. The middle part is sung rather "civilized" but the ending turns again into pure "Elvis-Blues".

Big Boss Man
An R&B hit for Jimmy Reed (1961) and Gene Chandler (1964), but Elvis had the bestselling version in 1967. lt made number 38 in the USA. A composition of Luther Dixon. On harmonica: the master on this instrument - Charlie McCoy.

Stranger In My Own Home Town
The lyrics are Blues, Elvis' voice is earthy, the tempo is R&B, but the music is real black soul music of 1969. For the first time Elvis played again in a Memphis studio since his Sun-time in 54/55. The outcome was original music on the newest level. Live in the studio - Elvis can't be beaten.

Power Of My Love
One could say: "see above".' The left channel shows clearly the cooperation of session-leader Tommy Cogbill, one of the best men in this field, a top bass player. He injected Elvis with a musical "rejuvenation-cure" which made history. This session from the year 1969 was one of the most successful and the most creative one in his career.

My Babe
A live-recording from one of his first concerts from the so-called "Las Vegas-Comeback" in August '69. A strong R&B by Willie Dixon with the guitar of James Budon, who, from this time on, was about to co-direct the quality of music of all concerts.

Got My Mojo Working
This 4 1/2  minute-version in the studio was not really planned. lt was one of many "warm-up-songs", to improve vocal quality for later songs. But just by chance, the tape was running. A flipout recording, unfortunately to be watered down partly by addition of brass later on. In the original version it was a well-known song by Muddy Waters.

Steamroller Blues
In the original song of James Taylor (from the LP "Sweet Baby James", 102 weeks in the US Charts) the word "Blues" is present, Elvis omits it. This version dates back to the main rehearsal for the Aloha Show of Jan. 14,1973. lt is sung more relaxed than the well-known version. Elvis had on this very day the better "feeling", one does not have the Blues every day.


Thank you, Elvis

 


Tupelo, die Geburtsstadt von Elvis, liegt im S?en der USA, im Staate Mississippi. Schon damals als Junge konnte er sich nicht f? eine der beiden beliebten Musikarten entscheiden - Blues/Rhythm And Blues oder Country & Western, damals noch Hillbilly genannt. Er mochte beides. Und beides hat ihn gepr?t. So ist es nicht erstaunlich, dass viele seiner Aufnahmen auch von den Schwarzen voll akzeptiert wurden.

Noch den ersten schwarzen Charts, der "Harlem Hit Parade" Anfang 1940, wurde daraus die Top 15 der "Race Records". Am 17. Juni 1949 gab es dann die neue Formulierung daf? - Rhythm & Blues (R&B). Von 1956 bis 1963 wurden darin 28 Titel von Elvis gef?rt, zusammen waren es 227 Wochen. 4 Songs wurden Nummer 1, eine davon hielt sich alleine 18 Wochen in den Charts. 11 Wochen lang war Elvis dort insgesamt Nummer 1. 1964 gab es keine R & B Charts, danach w?e Elvis mit seinen Film-Songs nicht mehr in Frage gekommen. Ab 1969 gab es eine weitere Umbenennung. Die neue Formel hie?"Soul-Charts", eine Angelegenheit, die die Schwarzen unter sich ausmachten.

Aber Elvis hat den Blues nie vergessen. Hier seine wichtigsten Beitr?e zur Musikgeschichte des Blues.

When lt Rains It Really Pours

Das Original stammt von Billy Emerson, der es am 18. Sept. 1954 im Sun-Studio einspielte. Elvis hatte es dort geh?t und auch eine Aufnahme damit versucht. Erst 1957 entstand in den Radio Recorders Studios in Hollywood eine perfekte Einspielung.

New Orleans

Das wei? Autorengespann Tepper/Bennett erfand dieses schwarze Lied speziell f? den Film King Creole (1958). Eine Bluesnummer mit Dixieland-Jazz-Instrumenten. Eine der wohl gekonntesten Gesangsdarbietungen von Elvis.

lt Feels So Right

Eine Aufnahme aus der ersten Studio-Session nach Elvis' Milit?zeit im M?z 1960. In der Instrumentierung ein wei?r Blues, aber "schwarz" vorgetragen von Elvis. Au?rgew?nlich das "rollende" Schlagzeug von D.J. Fontana und Buddy Harman.

A Mess Of Blues

Der erste Elvis-Blues in Stereo, entstanden direkt vor "lt Feels So Right". "...jeder Tag ist ein blauer Montag, seit mein Baby mich verlassen hat...". Ein typischer Bluestext, hervorragend unterst?zt vom Pianisten Floyd Cramer.

Like A Baby

Elvis beweist seine Vielseitigkeit einmal mehr durch die Tatsache, dass dieses Lied nach "Fever" und vor dem Millionenhit "lt's Now Or Never" aufgenommen wurde. Drei grundverschiedene Musikstile in einer Session. Dominierendes Instrument ist das "r?rende" Saxophon von Boots Randolph.

Reconsider Baby

Die Originalfassung stammt von Lowell Fulson, einem der besten Westcoast-Gitarristen seiner Zeit. Er bevorzugte das saxophon?erladene Arrangement, das hier seine Wiederauferstehung feiert."Boots" spieltzwei Sax-Soli hintereinander, bei Elvis-Songs eine r?mliche Ausnahme. Typisch f? den Blues sind dieWiederholungen derTextzeilen. EineSupernummer, die auch in den 80er Jahren entstanden sein k?nte.

I Feel So Bad

Eine Komposition von Chuck Willis aus dem Jahre 1953. Ende der 50er wurde er als "King Of Stroll" mit Hits wie "What Am I Living For" und "C.C. Rider" bekannt. "I Feel So Bad" muss dem Rhythm & Blues zugerechnet werden und ist der gr?te Hit dieser Blues-Collection. Er erreichte 1961 Platz 5 der US-Pop-Charts. (England Platz 4, Deutschland Platz 19).

Give Me The Right

Der "wei?ste" Blues dieser LP. Auch Elvis klingt hier mehr "wei?quot; als "schwarz". Die Aufnahme entstand nach dem eben erw?nten "I Feel So Bad" Ein bluesiger Rhythmus mit einer sehr sch?en Melodie, zuerst erschienen auf der gelungenen LP "Something For Everybody"

Beach Boy Blues

Einer der wenigen Blues-Titel aus einem Film (Blue Hawaii). Die Strophen klingen schwarz; George Fields spielt eine stilechte Mundharmonika. Der Mittelteil ist sehr artig gesungen, doch der Schluss ist wieder reinster "Elvis-Blues".

Big Boss Man

Ein R & B-Hit f? Jimmy Reed (1961) und Gene Chandler (1964), doch Elvis' Version wurde 1967 die meistgekaufte. Sie erreichte Platz 38 in den USA. Eine Komposition von Luther Dixon. An der Mundharmonika der Meister dieses Instruments - Charlie McCoy.

Stranger In My Own Home Town

Der Text ist Blues, Elvis' Stimme ist erdig, das Tempo ist Rhythm & Blues, aber die Musik ist pechschwarze Soulmusik des Jahres 1969. Elvis spielte erstmals wieder seit der Sun-Zeit 1954/55 in Memphis im Studio. Das Ergebnis war urw?hsige Musik auf dem neuesten technischen Stand. Live im Studio - so war Elvis unschlagbar.

Power Of My Love

Man k?nte sagen, siehe oben. Der linke Kanal beweist deutlich die Mitarbeit von Session Leader Tommy Cogbill, einer der besten Leute seiner Branche, ein anerkannter Bassist. Er verpasste Elvis eine musikalische "Verj?gungskur", die in die Geschichte einging. Diese Session aus dem Jahre1969 war mit die erfolgreichste und kreativste seiner Laufbahn.

My Babe

Eine Live-Aufnahme eines seiner ersten Konzerte vom so genannten Las Vegas-Comeback im August 1969. Ein kr?tiger R & B von Willie Dixon mit einer satten Gitarre von James Burton, der ab dieser Zeit die musikalische Qualit? aller Konzerte mitbestimmen sollte.

Got My Mojo Working

Diese 4 1/2  Minuten-Version war im Studio eigentlich nicht geplant. Sie war eine von vielen "Aufw?meliedern", um f? sp?ere Songs gut bei Stimme zu sein. Zuf?lig lief aber das Band mit. Eine Wahnsinnsnummer, die leider sp?er durch die Zunahme von Bl?ern an einigen Stellen verw?sert wurde. In der Urform ein bekannter Song f? Muddy Waters.

Steamroller Blues

Im Originaltitel von James Taylor (aus der LP "Sweet Baby James", 102 Wochen in den amerikanischen Charts) kommt das Wort Blues vor, Elvis l?st es aus. Diese Version stammt aus der Generalprobe zur Aloha-Show vom 14. Januar 1973. Sie ist lockerer als die bekannte Fassung gesungen. Elvis hatte an diesem Tag das bessere Feeling, denn den Blues hat man nicht jeden Tag.

Danke Elvis